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Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma Course

$245.37 $18.50

Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma Course

$18

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Description

Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma

Forest schooling, also known as forest kindergarten or outdoor education, is an educational approach that emphasizes learning and play in natural settings. It is a form of experiential learning where children engage in hands-on activities in the forest or other natural environments, under the guidance of trained educators.

The forest school approach originated in Scandinavia in the 1950s, where it was known as “skogsmulle” or “the little forest creature”. Since then, it has spread to other parts of Europe and North America, where it has gained popularity in recent years.

Forest schools typically take place in wooded areas, parks, or other natural environments, where children are encouraged to explore and interact with the natural world. Activities may include building shelters, identifying plants and animals, playing games, creating art from natural materials, and engaging in sensory experiences such as feeling the texture of tree bark or listening to the sounds of the forest.

Forest schooling is based on the belief that children learn best through play and exploration, and that exposure to nature can have significant benefits for physical, emotional, and cognitive development. Proponents of forest schooling argue that it can promote creativity, problem-solving skills, resilience, and a sense of connection to the natural world.

Forest schools typically operate on a regular basis, with children attending sessions over a period of weeks or months. Educators are trained to facilitate learning in natural settings, and to provide a safe and supportive environment for children to explore and learn

By registering to this course today, you will have the ability to access material that help you to understand Forest Schooling.

Key Learning Points

The key learning points of the Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma include the following:

  1. Connection to nature: Forest schooling emphasizes the importance of developing a connection to nature, and provides children with opportunities to explore and interact with the natural world.
  2. Hands-on learning: Children engage in hands-on activities, such as building shelters, identifying plants and animals, and creating art from natural materials. This approach emphasizes experiential learning and encourages children to take an active role in their own learning.
  3. Play-based learning: Forest schooling emphasizes play as a means of learning, and encourages children to engage in unstructured, imaginative play in natural settings.
  4. Social-emotional development: Forest schooling can promote social-emotional development by encouraging children to work together, take risks, and develop resilience in a supportive, natural environment.
  5. Self-directed learning: Forest schooling emphasizes self-directed learning, where children are encouraged to follow their interests and explore topics in depth, rather than being limited by a specific curriculum.
  6. Environmental awareness: Forest schooling promotes environmental awareness and encourages children to develop a sense of responsibility for the natural world.
  7. Holistic development: Forest schooling emphasizes the importance of holistic development, and recognizes that learning is not limited to academic subjects. Children are encouraged to develop physical, emotional, and cognitive skills through their experiences in the forest.

Benefits of taking an Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma

Taking an Introduction to Forest Schooling Diploma can provide numerous benefits, including:

  1. Increased physical activity: Forest schooling provides children with opportunities for physical activity and movement, which can help to improve their health and wellbeing.
  2. Enhanced cognitive development: Exposure to nature has been shown to enhance cognitive development, including attention, memory, and problem-solving skills.
  3. Improved social skills: Forest schooling promotes social interaction and collaboration, which can help children to develop communication, teamwork, and conflict resolution skills.
  4. Reduced stress: Spending time in nature has been shown to reduce stress levels and promote relaxation.
  5. Greater creativity: Forest schooling encourages creative thinking and problem-solving, as children are encouraged to explore and experiment in a natural environment.
  6. Improved environmental awareness: Forest schooling can help to foster a sense of responsibility and respect for the natural world, and promote sustainable practices.
  7. Enhanced self-esteem and confidence: Forest schooling provides children with opportunities for self-directed learning and exploration, which can help to build self-esteem and confidence.
  8. Greater resilience: Exposure to natural challenges, such as changing weather conditions and uneven terrain, can help children to develop resilience and adaptability.

Overall, forest schooling can provide children with a unique and enriching learning experience that promotes physical, cognitive, and emotional wellbeing, and encourages a lifelong love of nature.

Course Modules

  1. Introduction to Forest Schooling
  2. Benefits of Forest Schooling for Practitioners and Students
  3. Child Development
  4. Tree Climbing, Obstacle Courses, and Games
  5. Sensory Walks, Foraging, and Shelter Building
  6. Campfire Activities
  7. Nature Arts and Crafts, Woodwork, and Animal Tracking
  8. Psychological and Neuroscientific Perspectives on Forest Schooling
  9. Therapeutic Angles of Forest Schooling
  10. Safety and Risk Assessment
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